The “great disconnect” between female leaders, the rebound from layoffs and fickle skepticism

The “great disconnect” between female leaders, the rebound from layoffs and fickle skepticism

Here is the version published for this week Forbes Our careers newsletter, which brings you the latest news, reviews and ideas about the workplace, leadership and the future of work straight to your inbox every Wednesday. Click here for newsletter list!

TIt’s just a descriptive word to indicate a trend that might be more than using the word “quiet” at the moment – think Quit smoking quietAnd the Quiet shootinguntil “calm smiles“-great.” Center All the names of the “Great Resignation”.– The Great Reshuffle, The Great Reinvention, The Great Transport – We Have It Now big layoff (Seriously?) and what McKinsey and LeanIn.org call “big breakup. “

As Kim Elsizer, a senior contributor, wrote, it’s not about leaving women or getting out of the workforce. It’s about transitioning to companies that share their values ​​- prioritizing career advancement, supporting flexibility and work-life balance and emphasizing diversity and inclusion.

While this number sounds like just another name for the great quit, McKinsey and LeanIn’s research is interesting because it reminds us that people don’t just change jobs for better wages elsewhere; They are actively leaving institutions with which they are no longer compatible – even in a deteriorating economy. It’s no surprise this is happening because more workplaces are forcing employees back into the office – the survey, for example, found that while nearly 20% of men would like to work primarily on-site, only 10% of women , who often play the default role of primary caregivers feel the same way.

These trends have a lasting effect. If fewer women enter the company’s leadership ranks, they will have fewer shots to reach the highest score. My colleague Maggie McGrath – see featured story below – recently found that only three CEO and CFO duos run the 500 largest public companies in the US, following news that GSK has appointed Burberry executive Julie Brown as its new chief financial officer, to join To CEO Emma Walmsley in GSK’s C Suite.

Some women, of course, choose a completely different path. As part of her coverage of over 50 years, Maggie profiles Diane Hendricks, who beat cancer twice and survived the tragic death of her husband on her way to becoming the richest self-made woman in the country. In the past five years, she has tripled her net worth to more than $12 billion.

As always, thank you for helping editor Amy Lucas for helping put together this week’s newsletter. I hope you have a wonderful week.


Featured story

Why are there no more pairs of female leaders at the top?

Only three CEO and CFO duos run the 500 largest US public companies. Maggie McGrath explores why there is no more.


work smart

Here are five ways you can talk positively about a negative work experience at your next interview.

Want to catch someone’s attention via email? Here’s how to write a note over the network that opens.

Dismissed – Temporarily discharged? Here’s how to recover quickly.

Here’s how to get good results from your company’s employee engagement survey.

Could a side hustle get you fired? What you should know about redundancy.


On our agenda

Meta and metaverses: Is our work life moving into the Metaverse anytime soon? Forbes Major shareholder Paul Tassi is skeptical. Last week, Mark Zuckerberg unveiled his latest plans, unveiling a $1,500 Oculus Pro headset, updates to avatar designs, and Microsoft product integration. With so many goals and expansions, “the main problem with Mark’s metaverse is that it’s a solution looking for dozens of problems,” Tassi wrote.

Employee dissatisfaction: We’ve all heard about “quiet take off” and how it affects businesses. But as Forbes Teresa Gilarducci, a major contributor, writes that a great deal of worker dissatisfaction occurs and reveals itself in other, louder ways such as polls, individual resignations and worker protests.

Workers now value job security more than flexible work: Job security in a stable company is of great importance to more than half of the workers surveyed at 15 companies, according to data from global telecoms company BCW. Telecommuting, co-working and the flexibility they offer were at the top of the workers’ concerns, but expectations, demands, and requirements weren’t what they were even six months ago, Forbes Contributor Tracy Brewer writes.

Consequences of paying dismissal: You may get severance pay when you leave your job, get laid off, or get fired. You may also get damages if you file a claim and settle. Forbes Senior Shareholder Robert Wood explains how you should think about relevant tax issues.

Search for your filtered job: Glassdoor’s new feature allows jobs to be searched not just by location or job title, but filtered by demographic ratings or areas of interest such as work-life balance—issues of increasing importance to people looking for jobs, writes Dana Brownlee.


book club

Billionaire co-founder of Home Depot Bernie Marcus– A member of Forbes 400 – He came out with new business memoirs about his life and career, reinforcing his belief that a do-it-yourself attitude is needed in today’s world, and how it can help not only in business building but in charitable or other social impact efforts.


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